Category Archives: 2012 Presidential Election

Romney Strategy



Today’s Politico story clearly captures Mitt Romney’s basic campaign strategy:

Romney’s repeated promise to “repeal Obamacare” is sure to be curtailed, even with a Republican Senate, his advisers admit. One official said that under a Democratic Senate, “we would just have to try to grind out changes by starving Obamacare through regulations.”

……

Already, Romney aides know they have promised more than they can pull off. Talk of immigration reform in the first year — a Romney promise from the second presidential debate — caused aides to roll their eyes.”

 Strategy summary:  Say anything.

˜  John Kenny

 

 

Mounting Fears Shake World Markets As Banking Giants Rush to Raise Capital



That was the Wall Street Journal’s A1 headline exactly four years ago, with the lede; “Fear coursed through the U.S. financial system on Wednesday, as hope for a resolution to the year-old credit crisis faded.” A true financial panic, with the proverbial chickens hatched during the Bush administration coming home to roost.

The Romney campaign has tried to recycle the question that helped propel Ronald Reagan to the White House: “Are you better off than you were four years ago?”

Mitt should ask that question at his fundraisers. The financial services executives in attendance should be the first to answer.

~ John Kenny

The Party of War & A Non-Warrior



In Mitt Romney, the Republican party has it’s first presidential candidate since Tom Dewey without any military experience.  What will this mean for the Republicans and their narrative as the Party of War?

Every Republican presidential nominee from Dwight Eisenhower to John McCain served in the military.  Eisenhower, of course, had the ultimate military background as a West Point graduate who rose to five-star general and Supreme Allied Commander.  Bob Dole and John McCain suffered grievous wounds in combat, with McCain additionally suffering wounds from torture at the hands of his North Vietnamese captors.  For both of them, their military service was a modest amount of time in their professional lives yet had a profound impact on them personally and in forming their professional identities.  For others, such as Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan, serving in a supply unit and a film unit respectively, their World War II military service was a minor part of their professional identity, but a part nonetheless.
Continue reading The Party of War & A Non-Warrior